I collected data! Now what?!

Abby photoWe’re coming to the close of yet another academic year and you did it! You surveyed students or tracked who did (and didn’t!) visit your office or understood the student learning outcomes from a program or whatever we keep preaching about on this blog. But, now what???? If you read any assessment book, at this point there are common next steps that include things like “post-test” and “close the loop” and a bunch of other common (and good!) assessment wisdom. But sometimes that common assessment wisdom isn’t actually helping any of us professionals DO something with all this data. Here are a few things I do with my data before I do something with my data:

  1. Share the data in a staff meeting: Your colleagues may or may not be formally involved in the specific program you assessed but they work with the same students, so they’ll be able to make connections within student learning and to other programs/services that you’re missing. Ask them about the themes they’re seeing (or not seeing!) within the data. It’ll help you clarify the outcomes of your data, bring more people into the assessment efforts in your office (more heads are better than one!), and it’s a nice professional development exercise for the whole team. Teamwork makes the dream work!
  2. Talk to peer colleagues about their version of the same data: Take your data* to a conference, set up a phone date with a colleague at a peer school, or read other schools’ websites. Yes, you’ll likely run into several situations that aren’t directly applicable to yours, but listen for the bits that can inspire action within your own context.
  3. Take your data to the campus experts: Know anyone in Institutional Research? Or the head of a curriculum committee? Or others in these types of roles? These types of people work with the assessment process quite a bit. Perhaps take them to coffee, make a new friend, and get their take.
  4. Show your data* to student staff in your office: Your student staff understand the inner workings of your office AND the student experience, so they’re a perfect cross section of the perspective that will breathe life into the patterns in your data. What do they see? What data patterns would their peers find interesting? What does it mean to them?

WOW, can you tell I’m an extrovert?! All of my steps include talking. Hopefully these ideas will help you to not only see the stories of student learning and programmatic impact in your data, but also to make the connections needed to progress toward closing the loop.

* This goes without saying, but a reminder is always good; make sure to autonomize the data you show students and those outside of your office/school!

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