High Impact Practices: Resources

2015-03-14_OhNoLogo22-abby3Hands-on learning, experiential education, engaged learning, whatever you may call it, student affairs professionals can agree that creating an environment in which students test, reflect upon, and reapply their learning will result in better outcomes (read: more bang for your higher education buck). We know this anecdotally but the High Impact Practices (HIP) research out there provides the data to support the level of engagement HIP have on the collegiate experience as well as gives professionals ideas and steps for how to enact all of this goodness (or more likely maximize what you already have). What is clear in all of the research is that the next level of this engaged learning is not the mere existence of experiential education, but rather that students have multiple opportunities to engage in high impact learning and that we properly assess these efforts and students’ level of learning.

Provided today at Oh no are resources for you to dive in more…

According to the George Kuh via NSSE, high impact practices:

  • demand considerable time and effort,
  • facilitate learning outside of the classroom,
  • require meaningful interactions with faculty and students,
  • encourage collaboration with diverse others, and
  • provide frequent and substantive feedback

Below are the most widely held examples for HIPs from AAC&U:

HIP_tables (1)-page-001

On the NSSE website, you can build your own report with the data they’ve collected in 2013 and 2014 – so fun!! Give it a try and sift through it to review the fun findings. Have I mentioned FUN!

Ashley Finley (on behalf of the AAC&U) provides some brief (though important) thoughts on proper execution of HIPs:

Other Videos to Watch (or more likely, just listen to in the background while you work on something else and occasionally look at):

  • George Kuh presentation about HIPs:

  • Ashley Finley’s plenary presentation about integrative learning:

What high impact practices are you working within? Where have you found success?

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2 thoughts on “High Impact Practices: Resources

  1. Pingback: Stay the Course: Reminders for When Assessment Gets Messy |

  2. Pingback: STAY THE COURSE: Reminders for When Assessment Gets Messy « StylusPub

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